Make Your Own Dish Washing Detergent

15 Wed, 2011 § 2 Comments

It is more rewarding to make my own anything from scratch, even if it’s just to scrub away germs.

The ingredient list is sort of scary once you start looking more closely at conventional cleaners.  The “natural” ones don’t always work as well, aren’t always as natural as they portray & can be on the expensive side.  I like how my own cleaners & detergents work, feel safer using them & am reducing our household waste even more by making my own (ie reducing the amount of packaging we consume).

Before we left Utah, my spinning instructor gave me a few recipes, one of them being for dish washing detergent.  I have been waiting for ours to run out, so I could finally give it a go.

Most of these ingredients come in large containers & can be used to make multiple batches as well as for other household cleaners, such as laundry detergent which I plan to make soon.  At the bottom, I have noted where to find the less familiar ingredients.

Dish Detergent for Machine Washing

48 Loads

~$4.37 = less than $0.10 per load

  • 1/2 citric acid
  • 1 cup Borax
  • 1 cup Super Washing Soda
  • 1/2 cup kosher salt

Combine ingredients & store in a sealed container.  Use 1 T per load.  As a rinse aid, pour distilled vinegar into the aid dispenser.

Notes: After storing it, mine clumped together a little, but that may have been because I forgot the salt when I initially mixed it.  Either way, it still dissolved in the wash & cleaned our dishes wonderfully.  We washed & save an old, unmarked protein powder container as well as the scoop to store & measure our detergent.

A couple weeks ago, I was distracted searching store after store for the detergent ingredients & suddenly ran out of liquid dish soap.  I realized I already had nearly everything I needed on hand, so I decided to throw together this liquid soap as well.

Lavender & Lemon Liquid Dish Soap

  • 2 cups warm water
  • 3 T liquid castile soap
  • 2 tsp vegetable glycerin
  • 2 T distilled white vinegar
  • 5 drops lavender essential oil
  • 5 drops lemon essential oil
  • 5 drops tea tree oil

Combine ingredients in a bottle & shake gently.  Use about 1 T per sink full.

Notes: I used unscented castile soap because it’s what I had, but feel free to use your favorite scent.  Lavender would be nice.  This is thinner & does not sud like traditional soap, but it will still clean dishes.  It seems to do a better job at cutting through grease.  You can leave out the vegetable glycerin if you can’t find it & don’t want to order it.  The lavender, lemon & tea tree not only smell lovely but have antibacterial properties as well.

Citric Acid ~ Natural Food & Supplement Stores (most expensive here; I got it on sale $2.99/4oz), Nutsonline (best price $3.99/lb), Brewing & Wine-Making supply stores (good prices)

Borax ~ Target ~$4.00 for 76 oz (multiple batches)

Super Washing Soda ~ Ace $4.29 for 55 oz (multiple batches)

Vegetable Glycerin ~ Vitacost $3.99 for 4 oz (multiple uses)

Essential Oils ~ Natural Food & Supplement Stores – essential oils can be expensive; but because they are concentrated & you’ll only ever use a few drops at a time, they last a long time.  (multiple uses)

Liquid Castile Soap ~ This is becoming easier to find; I’ve seen it at Natural Food Stores as well as Target.  Again, it is sort of pricey, but I watch for it to go on sale & buy a large container.  I use it to make all of my cleaning products, to clean wounds & for various other uses & have yet to go through my 32-oz container.  A small amount goes a long way.  (multiple uses)

~

Do you make any of your own cleaners or detergents?

“Raw” Chocolate with Sea Salt

29 Tue, 2011 § 4 Comments

I am sort of insecure when it comes to cooking or baking for people.  Yes, selfishness might play a small role when it comes to sharing some of my treats as well 😉 ; but I have such different taste than many people, I worry.

I said I would practice & perfect my chocolate making before sharing a “recipe” – I will still practice & perfect, don’t you worry – but after approving “mmms” when Dave took some to work to share with friends, I decided I could share what I did.  [Honestly, I think they were simply impressed by the fact I made chocolate myself.]

The idea of making my own “raw” chocolate was initially intimidating, but there is not much to it!  And you need only one pot.

This isn’t really a recipe but loose instruction on what I did, which was actually just a lot of pouring, melting & tasting.  If anyone is interested in giving chocolate-making a go, maybe this will give you a good place to start.

I mentioned before I read equal parts of fat, chocolate & sweetener by weight is key.  If you try this & have a kitchen scale, please let us know if this is accurate; also, feel free to include approximate, coordinating volume measurements too! [for those of use without a scale]

I started with equal parts coconut butter & [shaved] raw cacao butter, totaling about ¾ cup.  I melted this in a small saucepan over low heat & removed from the burner once it was liquid.  I stirred in a scant 1.5 cup raw cacao powder until mixed well; then added 2 big spoonfuls of almond butter, mashing & mixing until well incorporated.  I also stirred in 1 – 2 tsp [alcohol-free] vanilla.  I used raw blue agave to sweeten, maybe 2 – 4 T – with the agave I really just squeezed a bit from the bottle, tasted, squeezed a bit more, tasted, etc.  It is really about tasting as you go & finding your perfect preference!  You could also use raw honey or maple to sweeten instead.  I finished off with a couple [or maybe just one] teaspoons of sea salt & poured into molds to freeze.  I also sprinkled a little sea salt over half the cups for extra saltiness before freezing — you really have not lived until pairing chocolate with sea salt.  You could add other flavors like cinnamon, mint instead of vanilla, espresso powder, finely chopped dried fruit or nuts or make it really pretty with pink Himalayan sea salt.  My next batch will include lavender-sea salt.

This made enough to fill 12 silicone cupcake molds halfway, which is a lot of homemade, dark chocolate!  I am not complaining though. 😉  We keep them in an airtight container in the freezer & chop each cup into quarters.  They are going to last awhile.  A small piece is indulgent.  In the future, I will make half the amount & freeze in mini cupcake molds or small candy molds.

To start off our anniversary weekend, we paired a couple pieces of this chocolate with vanilla bean coconut ice cream & vanilla-wafer-like cookies by Country Choice.  Now I just need a recipe to make our own vanilla wafers.

Thank you for the sweet anniversary wishes!!!

~

Do you have a kitchen scale?  I am considering getting one.  What do you find most handy about having one?  Have you ever made homemade vanilla wafers?!

 

Where Am I?

You are currently browsing entries tagged with homemade at ARoadMoreBalanced.